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By harnessing the same process that powers the sun and the stars, fusion has the potential to be a zero-emission, safe and widely available source of energy. Fusion runs on hydrogen, and this fuel must be heated to immense temperatures – over 150 million degrees Celsius – to release its energy. Learn how a General Fusion power plant creates fusion energy with the infographic below, followed by full explanation of how the process works.

Fusion could provide an effective way of cleanly producing large amounts of energy, substantially reducing our reliance on fossil fuels. For fusion energy to make it to the grid, it needs to be converted into electricity. While this seems simple, the design of many fusion power plants in fact makes it very difficult to extract the energy and convert it to a useful form. General Fusion’s power plant design overcomes this challenge, because it enables the use of existing steam turbine technology to produce electricity from fusion. Learn how a General Fusion power plant converts fusion energy to electricity in the infographic below, followed by full explanation of how the process works.

General Fusion’s scientists working with Microsoft’s software experts to explore experimental plasma data in greater depth than previously possible Vancouver, Canada - General Fusion, an industry leading clean energy company, is partnering with Microsoft’s Developer Experience Team to unlock critical insights into its experimental results using cloud-based big data techniques. These insights will help forge the company’s solution to the challenge of developing a practical commercial fusion energy technology. This collaboration was announced at the Microsoft Build 2017 developer conference in Seattle on May 12, and joins General Fusion’s plasma scientists together with Microsoft’s specialized software development team to build a new, cutting-edge computational platform - a platform that will enable General Fusion to mine over 100 terabytes of data from the records of its 150,000 experiments for new knowledge about how fusion energy is created and controlled.

- Bryson Masse, VICE Motherboard: In the suburbs of Vancouver, a team is working on what they think is humanity's best chance at clean, unlimited power, something we desperately need. A startup called General Fusion is building a nuclear fusion reactor and, if they succeed, it could mean the end of the fossil fuel era. Instead, we'd get our power from the same process that occurs in stars—at least, that's the dream.

- Quirks & Quarks, CBC Radio with Bob McDonald: The Hot Docs International Documentary Festival is underway in Toronto this weekend. In it's line-up is a documentary about nuclear fusion called Let There Be Light. It's about the feasibility of fusion as a carbon-free source of energy. The film explores two different approaches to achieving this holy grail. One is the very large scale, twenty billion dollar project called ITER (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor), which is currently under construction in France. ITER is described by Dr. Mark Henderson, the project's Microwave Heating System leader, as the largest ever scientific enterprise in the the world. The other is the much lower cost fusion research by the Burnaby, British Columbia company General Fusion, founded by Dr. Michel Laberge.

- Daniel Clery, Science Magazine When finally complete in 2025, the $20 billion fusion reactor called ITER, rising near Cadarache in France, will be seven stories tall. Even then, nothing guarantees that it can induce nuclei to fuse and release energy. Now, a small U.K. company has unveiled a 2-meter-tall chamber that looks like an oversized beer keg and cost about £10 million to develop. Using a different reactor shape than ITER and, eventually, superconducting magnets, the company says it has a cheaper and faster path to an energy-producing fusion reaction. It is not alone. A few other privately financed startups are also challenging the status quo and two in North America are building new machines in the next few years that aim to get close to the break-even point, where the energy generated equals the energy put into the system.

2-time Emmy winner Mila Aung-Thwin (EyeSteelFilm) explores the pursuit of fusion energy, and follows the efforts of scientists building an artificial star on Earth that will provide perpetual, cheap, clean energy for all mankind. General Fusion founder Dr. Michel Laberge features prominently, in a fast-paced documentary illustrated with vivid animations.

By Michael Delage - Chief Technology Officer at General Fusion The media coverage surrounding the Fusion 2030 proposal has been a reminder that the promise of fusion is not lost on the world. In shining the spotlight on this report, a discussion has ignited about practical pathways for clean energy technology and its development. General Fusion is a strong supporter of Fusion 2030, and I have been speaking to people around the country and describing to them what the pathway to making fusion a commercial reality might look like. As for any new technology, there’s a development pathway that needs to be travelled to take fusion from lab experiment to power on the grid. We’re further along this pathway than at any point in history, but there’s still road to travel and challenges to overcome. For Canada, the first step is capacity building: national leadership to renew our research infrastructure and invest in Canadian talent.