Quick Links

General Fusion’s scientists working with Microsoft’s software experts to explore experimental plasma data in greater depth than previously possible Vancouver, Canada - General Fusion, an industry leading clean energy company, is partnering with Microsoft’s Developer Experience Team to unlock critical insights into its experimental results using cloud-based big data techniques. These insights will help forge the company’s solution to the challenge of developing a practical commercial fusion energy technology. This collaboration was announced at the Microsoft Build 2017 developer conference in Seattle on May 12, and joins General Fusion’s plasma scientists together with Microsoft’s specialized software development team to build a new, cutting-edge computational platform - a platform that will enable General Fusion to mine over 100 terabytes of data from the records of its 150,000 experiments for new knowledge about how fusion energy is created and controlled.

- Daniel Clery, Science Magazine When finally complete in 2025, the $20 billion fusion reactor called ITER, rising near Cadarache in France, will be seven stories tall. Even then, nothing guarantees that it can induce nuclei to fuse and release energy. Now, a small U.K. company has unveiled a 2-meter-tall chamber that looks like an oversized beer keg and cost about £10 million to develop. Using a different reactor shape than ITER and, eventually, superconducting magnets, the company says it has a cheaper and faster path to an energy-producing fusion reaction. It is not alone. A few other privately financed startups are also challenging the status quo and two in North America are building new machines in the next few years that aim to get close to the break-even point, where the energy generated equals the energy put into the system.

Clean energy company preparing to scale up Vancouver, Canada - General Fusion has revealed that one of the most critical and complex areas of its research and development – plasma injector technology - has now reached the minimum performance levels required for a larger scale, integrated prototype. This marks a significant step in the company’s progress toward development of its fusion energy technology.

Chief Scientist discussed advances towards clean, safe and abundant energy Vancouver, Canada - “Private companies are accelerating the development of commercially viable fusion energy,” the Canadian fusion pioneer Dr. Michel Laberge told the International Energy Agency’s Fusion Power Coordinating Committee in Paris last week. Speaking alongside directors from Europe’s major publicly-funded fusion programs at the committee’s meeting on January 25, Dr. Laberge outlined General Fusion’s technical advances and plans for developing a prototype.

2017 list of Top Private Companies in clean technology chosen from a record number 9,900 companies from 77 countries world-wide

VANCOUVER, CANADA — (January 23, 2017) — General Fusion, a global leader in the development of fusion energy, today announced it was named to the prestigious 2017 Global Cleantech 100, produced by Cleantech Group, whose mission is to connect corporations to sustainable innovation. It is the third year in a row that General Fusion has made the prestigious list.

The Fusion Underground: Can Small Fusion Energy Start-Ups Conquer the Problems That Killed the Giants? The November 2016 edition of Scientific American features General Fusion as it explores the private companies pursuing fusion energy. A few bold physicists—some backed by billionaires—are exploring faster, cheaper roads to the ultimate source of clean energy

The latest news and developments at General Fusion and the world of fusion energy. Receive a quarterly email newsletter packed with information on our R&D activities, research collaborations and media coverage.

The founders of Amazon and Microsoft are putting their fortunes into little-known fusion energy companies. Jonathan Frochtzwajg digs into a story that has strange parallels with fiction. General Fusion is just one of a pack of private fusion firms to catch the attention of physicists and investors. Unencumbered by red tape, these venture-backed companies believe that they can find a faster, cheaper way to fusion than government-sponsored projects, and some very influential people agree: besides Bezos, Microsoft cofounder Paul Allen and PayPal cofounder Peter Thiel are also backing firms at the forefront of fusion development.