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On a sprawling campus in southern France, a revolutionary kind of power plant is steadily rising from the ground. Scientists and engineers from dozens of countries are building a facility that will eliminate all the negatives of today’s power supplies -- greenhouse gas emissions, toxic air pollution, radioactive meltdowns -- while still providing massive amounts of electricity around the clock. At least, that’s the goal.

Sharing Science Radio is one of the ventures by the members of UBC Sharing Science, a group of students dedicated to making science interesting and accessible to all members of the community. Sharing Science toured General Fusion and spoke with Michael Delage, General Fusion's VP Strategy and Corporate Development, on the differences between nuclear fusion and nuclear fission, why General Fusion has built a huge metal everlasting gobstopper (or at least what looks like one), and how to tame plasma with a temperature of 150 million degrees C.

After decades of slow progress and massive investment, some fusion power researchers are changing tactics You can accuse fusion power advocates of being overly optimistic but never of thinking small. Fusion occurs when two elements combine, or “fuse,” together to form a new, third element, converting matter to energy. It is the process that powers the sun, and the fusion world's marquee projects are accordingly grand.

A group of start-ups is promising a new and virtually unlimited source of power, one that produces none of the gases scientists say contribute to global warming.

The only problem? A way to harness the energy source, nuclear fusion — the reaction that gives birth to sunlight — still needs to be invented.

A day after announcing his party's plan for the environment and the economy, Liberal Leader Justin Trudeau along with candidates Jonathan Wilkinson, Terry Beech, and Adam Pankratz chose to visit General Fusion today to highlight the importance of Canadian investments in clean technology R&D.  It was a great, engaging discussion.