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The CBC's Découverte science program on fusion efforts around the world and at home in Canada with General Fusion. Des chercheurs des quatre coins du monde sont en compétition pour accomplir un exploit qui échappe à la science depuis plus de 60 ans : créer des réacteurs de fusion nucléaire pouvant fournir de l'énergie propre et illimitée à l'humanité.

By Brendan Cassidy - Open Innovation Manager At General Fusion we believe that collaboration and the open sharing of results is key to unlocking fusion and transforming the world’s energy supply. That means we are always looking at ways to engage others in our efforts to accelerate our pursuit of commercially viable fusion energy. We are actively engaged in the fusion community and regularly attend scientific conferences, collaborate with other fusion scientists such as those at Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL), and keep the public informed about our progress through the media. Recently we’ve gone outside the box by crowdsourcing some of our scientific and engineering challenges. Crowdsourcing has been successful for technical powerhouses such as NASA, so we’re in good company in going to the crowd.

General Fusion to outline how fusion can play a key role in helping the nation meet its innovation and clean energy objectives Burnaby, BC (November 28, 2016) — On Tuesday, November 29, General Fusion will address the House of Commons Standing Committee on Natural Resources, as Members of Parliament review Canada’s energy sector. Michael Delage, Vice President Technology and Corporate Strategy for the innovative clean energy company based in Burnaby will answer a wide range of questions from MPs on the current state of nuclear energy in Canada, research and development and prospects for future technologies.

The Fusion Underground: Can Small Fusion Energy Start-Ups Conquer the Problems That Killed the Giants? The November 2016 edition of Scientific American features General Fusion as it explores the private companies pursuing fusion energy. A few bold physicists—some backed by billionaires—are exploring faster, cheaper roads to the ultimate source of clean energy