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By Michael Delage - Chief Technology Officer at General Fusion The media coverage surrounding the Fusion 2030 proposal has been a reminder that the promise of fusion is not lost on the world. In shining the spotlight on this report, a discussion has ignited about practical pathways for clean energy technology and its development. General Fusion is a strong supporter of Fusion 2030, and I have been speaking to people around the country and describing to them what the pathway to making fusion a commercial reality might look like. As for any new technology, there’s a development pathway that needs to be travelled to take fusion from lab experiment to power on the grid. We’re further along this pathway than at any point in history, but there’s still road to travel and challenges to overcome. For Canada, the first step is capacity building: national leadership to renew our research infrastructure and invest in Canadian talent.

- Jon Hernandez, CBC News: Scientists are calling on the federal government to invest more in fusion research as a way to produce massive amounts of clean energy and radically reduce dependance on fossil fuels. Michael Delage, the chief technology officer at Burnaby-based General Fusion, says the goal is to develop a prototype fusion power plant by 2030 — that could eventually be scaled up to replace oil and gas. "It's something that could be competitive with fossil fuels on the grid," said Delage.

- Nelson Bennett, Business in Vancouver: A group of Canadian universities and institutes that includes the Fedoruk Centre for Nuclear Innovation is now rallying around Burnaby’s General Fusion in hopes of establishing a national strategy for Canadian fusion power. The group, which includes the universities of Saskatchewan and Alberta, is pitching a Fusion 2030 strategy that calls on the Canadian government to provide $125 million in funding over five years to help Canadian universities rebuild the academic capacity they once had in plasma physics and related fields.