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- Daniel Clery, Science Magazine When finally complete in 2025, the $20 billion fusion reactor called ITER, rising near Cadarache in France, will be seven stories tall. Even then, nothing guarantees that it can induce nuclei to fuse and release energy. Now, a small U.K. company has unveiled a 2-meter-tall chamber that looks like an oversized beer keg and cost about £10 million to develop. Using a different reactor shape than ITER and, eventually, superconducting magnets, the company says it has a cheaper and faster path to an energy-producing fusion reaction. It is not alone. A few other privately financed startups are also challenging the status quo and two in North America are building new machines in the next few years that aim to get close to the break-even point, where the energy generated equals the energy put into the system.

- Jon Hernandez, CBC News: Scientists are calling on the federal government to invest more in fusion research as a way to produce massive amounts of clean energy and radically reduce dependance on fossil fuels. Michael Delage, the chief technology officer at Burnaby-based General Fusion, says the goal is to develop a prototype fusion power plant by 2030 — that could eventually be scaled up to replace oil and gas. "It's something that could be competitive with fossil fuels on the grid," said Delage.

- Nelson Bennett, Business in Vancouver: A group of Canadian universities and institutes that includes the Fedoruk Centre for Nuclear Innovation is now rallying around Burnaby’s General Fusion in hopes of establishing a national strategy for Canadian fusion power. The group, which includes the universities of Saskatchewan and Alberta, is pitching a Fusion 2030 strategy that calls on the Canadian government to provide $125 million in funding over five years to help Canadian universities rebuild the academic capacity they once had in plasma physics and related fields.

The CBC's Découverte science program on fusion efforts around the world and at home in Canada with General Fusion. Des chercheurs des quatre coins du monde sont en compétition pour accomplir un exploit qui échappe à la science depuis plus de 60 ans : créer des réacteurs de fusion nucléaire pouvant fournir de l'énergie propre et illimitée à l'humanité.

The Fusion Underground: Can Small Fusion Energy Start-Ups Conquer the Problems That Killed the Giants? The November 2016 edition of Scientific American features General Fusion as it explores the private companies pursuing fusion energy. A few bold physicists—some backed by billionaires—are exploring faster, cheaper roads to the ultimate source of clean energy

The Canadian Business Journal reports that the founder and Chief Scientist of Vancouver-based General Fusion, Dr. Michel Laberge, was named today as one of Canada’s Clean50 for 2017. The Clean50 award recognizes Canada’s leaders in sustainability and their role in transitioning to a low carbon future. Dr. Laberge was recognized in the research and development category for his work on fusion energy.

The old joke about fusion is that it is 30 years from becoming a reality — and that’s been the case for the last 50 years or more. It’s a joke that may quickly be reaching its sell-by date. And a good thing too. The promise of fusion is near-unlimited energy that produces almost no waste.