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Presentation Abstract Speaker: Dr. Michel Laberge (General Fusion): Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF) involves rapidly compressing an initial magnetically confined plasma by >300X volume compression. If near adiabatic compression is achieved, the final plasma can be heated to > 10 keV, and confined inertially to produce interesting fusion energy gain. General Fusion is developing a compression system using pneumatic pistons to collapse a cavity formed in liquid lead-lithium, heating a plasma target such as a spheromak or spherical toroid trapped in the cavity.  With a low-cost driver, straightforward heat extraction, good tritium breeding ratio and excellent neutron protection, the concept is promising as a practical power plant. We will review the plasma formation and compression results achieved so far and our plans moving forwards. Work on the compression system will also be described.

Presentation Abstract Speaker: Blair P. Bromley (Chair, CNS Fusion Energy Science and Technology Division): An overview of alternative fusion concepts in Canada and internationally, including MTF/MIF devices, spherical tokamaks, magnetic mirrors and polywell devices, with a look at the state of the art at public and private ventures.

Presentation Abstract Speaker: Dr. Michel Laberge: General Fusion (GF) is a private company developing fusion energy with the ultimate goal of building a fusion power plant. We are using a novel technique called Magnetized Target Fusion (MTF), first proposed by the US Naval Research Lab in the 1970’s. In MTF, one first creates a magnetically confined moderately warm plasma of around 100 eV in a flux conserver. The flux conserver is then rapidly compressed. The magnetic field cannot penetrate the flux conserver on the time scale of the implosion. Magnetic field and plasma are compressed to the high temperature, magnetic field and pressure required for a fast fusion burn (microseconds). General Fusion’s Magnetized Target Fusion system uses a ~3m sphere filled with molten lead-lithium that is pumped to form a cavity.  A pulse of magnetically-confined plasma fuel is then injected into the cavity. Around the sphere, an array of pistons drive a pressure wave into the centre of the sphere, compressing the plasma to fusion conditions. This process is then repeated, while the fusion neutrons from the reaction are captured in the liquid metal and used to generate electricity via a steam turbine. A standard heat exchanger-steam turbine produces electric power, and some of the steam is recycled to run the pistons. Initial plasmas with performance sufficient to do compression experiments have been developed. Because of the size and capital cost of building a large-scale piston driven compression system, plasma compression experiments presently form these plasmas in an aluminum flux conserver that is rapidly compressed using a chemical driver. The results of these experiments will be presented.

Abstract An innovative gas compression system is proposed and computationally researched to achieve short time response as needed in engineering applications as hydrogen fusion energy reactors and high speed hammers. The system consists of a reservoir containing high pressure gas connected to a straight tube which in turn is connected to a spherical duct, where at the sphere’s centre plasma resides in the case of a fusion reactor. Diaphragm located inside the straight tube separates the reservoir’s high pressure gas from the rest of the plenum. Once the diaphragm is breached the high pressure gas enters the plenum to drive pistons located on the inner wall of the spherical duct that will eventually end compressing the plasma.

Poster This poster was presented at the 58th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, and provides an overview of magnetic compression experiments being conducted at General Fusion. These experiments are designed as repetitive non-destructive tests to study plasma physics applicable to General Fusion's magnetized target fusion concept.

Poster This poster was presented at the 58th Annual Meeting of the APS Division of Plasma Physics, and provides an overview of magnetic compression experiments being conducted at General Fusion. These experiments are designed as repetitive non-destructive tests to study plasma physics applicable to General Fusion's magnetized target fusion concept.